How Your Website Can Help Recruit And Support Employees

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Tell them why they should give a hoot.

Every business owner knows to promote their products and services, but most will overlook the importance of selling the company as an appealing place to work. You need to show potential hires and existing employees why they should work for you instead of someone else.

Think about the people that make your company possible and how your website might boost your recruiting efforts and serve your team on a regular basis.

 

 

Recruit

Show what it’s like to work there.

 

These pages can act as digital brochures that help your recruiters show off the company to potential hires and do a lot of the talking for them, so that they can focus on outreach and interviews.

 
 

Photos and Video.
Show what the office looks like or what they can expect their days to look like.

The majority of our lives are spent at work, so give people a visual of what their future holds.

Team Interviews.
Avoid boring old basic statements that sound like every other place.

“This is a great place to work.” “Everyone here is like family.” Yeah Yeah…

Get stories about real experiences that are interesting to read.

CEO Interview.
Introduce people to the person who's guiding the ship and in charge of their careers.

A typed or video recorded interview with the CEO is a great opportunity to build trust and inspire.

Benefits.
Health care, maternity leave, 401K, profit sharing, vacation time, sick time, yatta yatta yatta…

Cover the basics then mention other things that make working there special.

For example… Apple Store discounts, standing desks, free coffee, high end computers… etc.

Team Culture.
Everyone knows that what makes a job amazing or a living hell is the group of people you work with.

Be completely honest. Never lie about personality types, energy levels during the workday, and social interaction. Don’t call it “fun” if it’s actually dead quiet all day.

Company Values.
What the heck do you stand for? Where do you draw the line with your employees, with your clients, and with the rest of the world?

If your company was a person, how would you describe them? If you don’t know who you are, no one else will either.

Company Mission.
Talk about the mission that your company is set on achieving.

Cover topics like — Why the company was started… What motivates it to keep on going… What it wants the future to look like… etc.

Job Listings.
Keep an updated list of jobs you’re trying to fill.

You could also include a description of the type of person you’re always open to hiring, even if a specific role isn’t listed.

Job Application Form.
Please, for the love of Odin, don’t feature a complex form that asks for all background info.

Just do a basic contact form with the ability to upload a resume and cover letter.

For fun, though, you could throw in a few questions to get to know their personality.

 

 

Support

Give your employees helpful resources.

 

These pages could be hidden from your website’s navigation and even password-protected, or these pages could be available for the public to see, to give a little transparency to your process.

 
 

Job Checklist.
Help your service providers keep track of what needs to be completed in each job.

Great for house cleaners.

Menu Tasting Notes.
To share with your wait staff so that they can effectively sell menu items and answer customer questions.

Great for restaurants.

Employee Handbook.
Turn your Handbook into a webpage that employees can easily find and reference.

Make sure that it’s easy to navigate with links that jump to the exact thing they were looking for.

Sales Tips.
Provide tips, tactics, and information that will help your sales staff. Word documents can be hard to keep organized and updated on everyone’s devices… And they’re often hard to find and access when one is mobile, so webpages are a great solution.

Great for Ambassador programs too.

FAQ.
Answer all of the frequently asked questions you hear. Especially give answers to any difficult questions that people might not want to come out and ask their managers.

At the very least, have an FAQ for your new recruits.

Event Calendar.
Encourage socialization that strengthens teamwork by featuring a calendar of planned events.

You could also keep a list of things that people can attend on their own, such as in-personal gatherings or online webinars hosted by other organizations.

 

 

Did this spark some ideas?

We can help you create your own career pages: hello@onthebrdg.com